ARC Review: Strange the Dreamer by Laini Taylor

BookReview

Written by: Laini Taylor
Release Date: March 28, 2017
Pages: 544, hardcover
Series: Strange the Dreamer, #1
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Book new epic fantasy by National Book Award finalist and New York Times bestselling author Laini Taylor of the Daughter of Smoke & Bone trilogy.

The dream chooses the dreamer, not the other way around— and Lazlo Strange, war orphan and junior librarian, has always feared that his dream chose poorly. Since he was five years old he’s been obsessed with the mythic lost city of Weep, but it would take someone bolder than he to cross half the world in search of it. Then a stunning opportunity presents itself, in the person of a hero called the Godslayer and a band of legendary warriors, and he has to seize his chance to lose his dream forever.

What happened in Weep two hundred years ago to cut it off from the rest of the world? What exactly did the Godslayer slay that went by the name of god? And what is the mysterious problem he now seeks help in solving?

The answers await in Weep, but so do more mysteries—including the blue-skinned goddess who appears in Lazlo’s dreams. How did he dream her before he knew she existed? and if all the gods are dead, why does she seem so real?

In this sweeping and breathtaking new novel by National Book Award finalist Laini Taylor, author of the New York Times bestselling Daughter of Smoke & Bone trilogy, the shadow of the past is as real as the ghosts who haunt the citadel of murdered gods. Fall into a mythical world of dread and wonder, moths and nightmares, love and carnage.

Welcome to Weep

LetsTalk

I think most of us can agree that Laini Taylor is a writing goddess. Her words have a melody that I’ve never seen any other author replicate, and the worlds she creates are magical, reminiscent of old fairy tales while still entirely her own.

So yeah. If you can’t already tell, I loved Strange the Dreamer.

The main character is Lazlo Strange, a librarian obsessed with stories, and particularly stories of a mysterious city called Weep. (But not actually called Weep–it’s complicated.) He’s basically the epitome of “beautiful cinnamon roll too good for the world too pure”. Basically, if you’re sick of alpha male type protagonists and want to read about a shy sweet bookworm who shows some great strength when the situation calls for it.

The other protagonist is Sarai, and she lives in a floating castle with her family and a bunch of ghosts, and basically anything I say about her origins will be a giant spoiler, but her past and the way she deals with it, her relationship with her power and her family and her background are all so compelling and she’s wonderful and brave and and I love her.

Also, Lazlo’s friend Calixte is wonderful and I am honestly shocked that I haven’t heard more people talking about her when she’s responsible for one of the Iconic quotes in this book (“beautiful and full of monsters”) and she’s a giant pile of sass and complements Lazslo’s character perfectly and is refreshing and lovely. (She’s also gay, and I’m hoping she and her girlfriend will get more screen time in Book 2).

Which brings me to how another thing I love about the world is the humor, because Laini Taylor’s stories are so Epic with a capital E and they could easily get too heavy, but there’s also this lightness in the way she writes and the way her characters see the world.

And the plot twists, oh my god, the plot twists! My current Goodreads review of the book is “Laini Taylor can fight me” so that should tell you something.

So why did I give Strange the Dreamer four stars instead of five? Funnily enough, the same reason I gave Daughter of Smoke and Bone four stars. Too. Much. Kissing.

I mean, don’t get me wrong, I love kissing, and I especially love the way Laini Taylor writes kissing because I especially love the way Laini Taylor writes anything, but after a certain point it just got to be too much. There was this giant block of Lazlo and Sarai looking into each other’s eyes and saying sweet things to each other and lying in bed together and after a while I just wanted to move on with the actual plot of the story. Plus, while I love Lazlo and Sarai individually, nothing about their romantic relationship really compelled me.

It also didn’t helped that I kind of shipped Lazlo with his rival Thyon. In my defense, within the first few pages of the book there was a scene where Lazlo and Thyon stared at each other for a few paragraphs and Lazlo was thinking about how beautiful Thyon was and then we found that Lazlo knew something about Thyon that no one else did. So, can you blame me for holding out hope for a hate-to-love thing between them? Can you really blame me?

But kissing-related issues aside, Strange the Dreamer is an enchanting, ethereal book with a rich ensemble cast and a fascinating world. If you’re looking forward to getting caught in the magic that is Laini Taylor’s words, you will not be disappointed.

Sondra 

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