ARC Review: The Bone Witch by Rin Chupeco

BookReview

Written by: Rin Chupeco
Release Date: March 7, 2017
Pages: 400, hardcover
Series: The Bone Witch, #1
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A Publishers Weekly Most Anticipated Young Adult Book of Spring 2017!

In the captivating start to a new, darkly lyrical fantasy series for readers of Leigh Bardugo and Sabaa Tahir, Tea can raise the dead, but resurrection comes at a price…

Let me be clear: I never intended to raise my brother from his grave, though he may claim otherwise. If there’s anything I’ve learned from him in the years since, it’s that the dead hide truths as well as the living.

When Tea accidentally resurrects her brother from the dead, she learns she is different from the other witches in her family. Her gift for necromancy means that she’s a bone witch, a title that makes her feared and ostracized by her community. But Tea finds solace and guidance with an older, wiser bone witch, who takes Tea and her brother to another land for training.

In her new home, Tea puts all her energy into becoming an asha-one who can wield elemental magic. But dark forces are approaching quickly, and in the face of danger, Tea will have to overcome her obstacles…and make a powerful choice.

Memoirs of a Geisha meets The Name of the Wind in this brilliant new fantasy series by Rin Chupeco!

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The Bone Witch attracted me because of its cool concept (a girl raises her brother from the dead and finds out she’s a magic necromancer who can protect the world from demons!) and beautiful cover. There was a lot I loved about the book, but ultimately it was not the spellbinding adventure I hoped it would be.

The greatest thing about The Bone Witch is the worldbuilding. The world is so rich and layered, the magic system is unique and fascinating, and the twists that separate it from many other fantasy worlds made the story a delight to read. There are powerful magical women, and scary undead demons, and magic necklaces, and men who forge hearts, and other fun things like that. The author clearly put a lot of thought into the intricacies of her world–everything from the fashion and food to the political situation to the mythology is described in detail. Given how short this book was, I was impressed with the complexity.

I also liked the structure. The story is told in alternating chapters–the main character, Tea, telling the story of her past and her training as an Asha, and a bard visiting Tea to learn her story years later, after her exile. The way the story is told kept wondering all the way through–what had happened to Tea? And what would she do now?

I loved Tea’s relationships with Fox, her brother whom she raised from the dead, and Mykaela, her mentor, a bone witch with an intriguing past. There was also some pretty cool discussion of gender roles.

What wasn’t there, you ask? A plot.

There was some action in the first 10% of the book, and the last 10%, but mostly it was set-up and infodumping, and a very extended training montage. And after a while I got bored. It took me three weeks to get through this book–it was THAT slow.

I also did not feel the romance at all. It was just…there, enough for me to feel its presence, but not enough to actually be developed.

There’s a lot to love about this book, and if you, like me, are intrigued by the concept and cover, I recommend that you give it a try. Unfortunately, it just was not for me.

 

Sondra 

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